Album Review: The Prince of Egypt (Original Cast Recording)

There’s two songs I could listen to for ages on the Original Cast Recording of The Prince of Egypt but I could easily leave the rest

“No power on earth can change that, brother”

There was a moment in the last couple of days as I listened to ‘Make It Right’ for the umpteenth time that I wondered whether I’d been a bit harsh to The Prince of Egypt when it opened in late February. I’d made the note ‘lovely duet’ at the time and on record, the sweet/strong combination of Liam Tamne and Luke Brady’s voices is an absolute winner as their fraternal connection is tested over soaring contrapuntal melodies and an orchestral backing that flows as effortlessly as the Red Sea

So too, the show’s most famous song (so much so that the publicity campaign basically centred on it) ‘When You Believe’ has a choral majesty that is undeniable. Alexia Khadime and Christine Allado lead the company with real style – the interplay of their voices in the middle chorus is spine-tingingly lovely – and the incorporation of the Hebrew-sung bridge (led by Mia Lakha) is a rare graceful moment of geo-specificity that works. Continue reading “Album Review: The Prince of Egypt (Original Cast Recording)”

Review: The Prince of Egypt, Dominion Theatre

Despite an excellent cast, The Prince of Egypt might be in need of a miracle at the Dominion Theatre

“For the rest of my life I’ll have to live with this”

Way way back, many centuries ago, but a little bit more after the Bible began, someone decided that Old Testament justice really was the way forward for musical theatre. And so here we have a musical that features two ethnic massacres of children but it’s all OK if you sing a ballad afterwards to atone (even if you’ve sanctioned the murder of your de facto nephew) and others will then tell you it’s ok “when you believe”.

The Prince of Egypt picks up a few generations after Joseph and co set up shop in the land of the Nile, where the Hebrew population is now spiralling out of control for the Egyptian authorities. Enlightened thinking about immigrants hasn’t quite reached these shores, so the Hebrews find themselves enslaved and upon the order of the slaughter of all their newborn boys by a grumpy Pharoah Seti, an intrepid Yocheved pops her baby into a basket and hopes that he’ll get picked up by a queen rather than a crocodile.  Continue reading “Review: The Prince of Egypt, Dominion Theatre”

News: cast of The Prince of Egypt announced

Full casting has been announced for the arrival of The Prince of Egypt at the Dominion Theatre next year.

Joining the previously announced Luke Brady (Moses), Liam Tamne (Ramses), Christine Allado (Tzipporah), Alexia Khadime (Miriam), Joe Dixon (Seti), Debbie Kurup (Queen Tuya), Gary Wilmot (Jethro), Adam Pearce (Hotep), Tanisha Spring (Nefertari) and Silas Wyatt-Barke (Aaron) will be Mercedesz Csampai (Yocheved), Simbi Akande, Casey Al-Shaqsy, Joe Atkinson, Danny Becker, Felipe Bejarano, Pàje Campbell, Adam Filipe, Soophia Foroughi, Natalie Green, Jack Harrison-Cooper, Rachael Ireson, Kalene Jeans, Christian Knight, Jessica Lee, Oliver Lidert, Jay Marsh, Scott Maurice, Carly Miles, Sam Oladeinde, Alice Readie, Christopher Short, Ricardo Walker, Danny Williams, Niko Wirachman and Sasha Woodward.

The Prince of Egypt has music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz and a book by Philip LaZebnik and is based on the DreamWorks Animation film of the same name. It will have direction by Scott Schwartz and is choreographed by Sean Cheesman with set design by Kevin Depinet, costume design by Ann Hould-Ward, lighting design by Mike Billings, sound design by Gareth Owen, projection design by Jon Driscoll and illusion design by Chris Fisher. Orchestrations are from August Eriksmoen with musical supervision and arrangements by Dominick Amendum, musical direction by Dave Rose and casting by Jim Arnold.

Review: Evita, Open Air Theatre

Jamie Lloyd’s reinvention of Evita at Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre proves a storming success

“I could find job satisfaction in Paraguay”

If this was the production of Evita that was forever touring the UK, then we could all be a hell of a lot more enthused about the future of UK theatre. Bill Kenwright might have the business side locked down with dull predictability but at the Open Air Theatre, Jamie Lloyd is unleashing a torrent of creative genius which proves inordinately exciting to witness.

He offers up a complete reimagining of the Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice musical and one which feels sparkingly fresh in every single aspect. The open bleachers of Soutra Gilmore’s design which turns our focus to the human relationships here, the striking physicality of Fabian Aloise’s choreography with its haunting screaming faces and way-cool domino effect points to societal trauma and most crucially, Lloyd allows the shadow of populist politics to loom large. Continue reading “Review: Evita, Open Air Theatre”

Review: Knights of the Rose, Arts

Less a rock musical and more Now That’s What I Call Music 1066, Knights of the Rose at the Arts Theatre threatens a return to the dark ages 

“Would you tremble if I touched your lips?
Or would you laugh?”

The website for Knights of the Rose leads with the quote “is this the most epic rock musical?” and bold as that is, well, the answer is most definitively no. That  much is evident from the start as a bunch of medieval knights start doing some slo-mo running on the spot as they return from war. But even as they dream of the ale to be drunk, the Bon Jovi songs to be sung, the wenches to be laid and other such Olde Worlde fare, a Knight’s lot is never done and a new battle upends their world once again. Sacrifice! Betrayal! Bonnie Tyler! In a time when Bat Out Of Hell can come back, maybe the rock musical is having a moment.

But wait, what the hell is Enrique Iglesias doing in here? Not only is ‘Hero’ a fantastically misjudged choice of song, the way in which its first line is used to lead into the track snaps you right out of the world of the show, as evidenced by an audience rolling in the aisles. It was the funniest thing I’ve seen in a theatre this year made all the more so by the fact that it was not meant to be at all hilarious.  An edited snippet of No Doubt’s ‘Don’t Speak’ feels similarly incongruous, ‘He Ain’t Heavy He’s My Brother’ pops up in a po-faced moment and overall, as the playlist starts to sound like Now That’s What I Call Music 1066, you begin to worry for the identity of this show which ultimately takes the idea of being a rock musical as seriously as fancy dress. Continue reading “Review: Knights of the Rose, Arts”

Review: Sunset Boulevard Curve, Leicester

“Smile a rented smile, fill someone’s glass
Kiss someone’s wife, kiss someone’s ass”

Ria Jones’ extraordinary history with Sunset Boulevard might well be entitled The Norma Conquests – from originally workshopping the role of Norma Desmond for Andrew Lloyd Webber (music) and Don Black and Christopher Hampton (book and lyrics) in 1991 to her headline-grabbing stint as Glenn Close’s understudy in last year’s ENO staged concert version of the show to finally getting to play the leading role in her own right on this UK tour, premiering at Leicester’s Curve, some 26 years later.

And was it worth the wait? Jones certainly is making the most of her well-deserved moment, offering a different skillset for her markedly different interpretation. Jones is undoubtedly the better singer, the lushness of her voice soaring effortlessly to the impassioned heights of the score. And she’s a different kind of actress, offering a brasher, more manic kind of energy to this former movie star caught up in a fantasy world when a young screenwriter (Danny Mac) accidentally offers hope to her faded career.  Continue reading “Review: Sunset Boulevard Curve, Leicester”

Album Review: Love Never Dies (2010 Concept Album)

“The world is hard, the world is mean

It’s hard to keep your conscience clean”

I hadn’t listened to Love Never Dies since seeing its very first preview (oh how we laughed when ALW ran furious from the stalls when the set broke down) and having popped on the concept album that was released in tandem, I was soon reminded why. The not-a-sequel to Phantom of the Opera too often feels like a lazy retread of familiar ground, demonstrating zero musical progression and revealing a stagnation where there once was innovation.

The Coney Island setting undercuts any attempt to get close to the gothic horror of the opera house, the ‘freak show’ elements are desperately tame there. The swerves into rock are ill-advised in the extreme. Lyrically, there’s no ingenuity here at all, the words play second fiddle to the music to their peril And above all, the interpolation of themes from Phantom serve as a constant reminder of what this is not, and also the ultimate folly of the enterprise. Continue reading “Album Review: Love Never Dies (2010 Concept Album)”

CD Review: The Light Princess (Original Cast Recording)

“No… it can’t be… is it gravity I am feeling?”

It’s been a goodly time coming, just over two years since it opened actually, but the Original Cast Recording of The Light Princess is finally here. Finely crafted by writers Tori Amos and Samuel Adamson with the original cast from the National Theatre production and recorded entirely under studio conditions, this double CD a triumphant achievement. It simultaneously acts as a perfect tribute to a much-loved show (one I saw five times during its too-short run #1#2#3#4#5), it also advances the score, refining its musicality into a more intense yet accessible experience.

Right from the opening bars of the ‘Prologue: Once Upon A Time’, Katherine Rockhill’s piano playing sounds amazing and is rightfully forefronted here as the cornerstone of Amos’ wide-ranging compositions, the lushness of the strings sound pretty special too. And with Rosalie Craig’s astonishing performance as Althea – the light princess herself – liberated from the constraints of this most physically demanding of roles (both for her and for us too, goggling at the inventiveness with which her floating was essayed), her vocal interpretation deepens into something even more affecting, impossible as it may seem to anyone who saw her amazing work onstage.  Continue reading “CD Review: The Light Princess (Original Cast Recording)”

2014 BroadwayWorld UK Awards Shortlist

Best Choreography in a New Production of a Musical
Bob Avian & Geoffrey Garratt – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Peter Darling – Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Theatre Royal, Drury Lane
Gary Lloyd – 20th Century Boy – The Grand Wolverhampton
Ann Yea – Urinetown – St James

Best Costume Design in a New Production of a Play or Musical
Andreane Neofitou – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Rae Smith – The Light Princess – National Theatre
Soutra Gilmour – Urinetown – St James Theatre
David Shields – Sister Act – Aberystwyth Arts Centre

Best Direction of a New Production of a Musical
Laurence Connor – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Matt Ryan – Dogfight – Southwark Playhouse
Jamie Lloyd – Urinetown – St Jamess
Paul Kerryson – Chicago – Curve Leicester

Best Direction of a New production of a Play
Yael Farber – The Crucible – The Old Vic
Declan Donnellan – Shakespeare in Love – Noel Coward Theatre
Jamie Lloyd – Richard III – Trafalgar Studios
Daniel Evans – The Full Monty – Noel Coward

Best Featured Actor in a New Production of a Musical
Kwang-Ho Hong – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Hugh Maynard – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward, London
Matthew Barrow – Chicago – Curve Leicester
Adam Pearce – Urinetown – St. James Theatre

Best Featured Actor in a New Production of a Play
Adrian Schiller – The Crucible – Old Vic Theatre
David Oakes – Shakespeare In Love – Noel Coward Theatre
Bill Nighy – Skylight – Wyndhams
Andrew Scott – Birdland – Royal Court

Best Featured Actress in a New Production of a Musical
Rachelle Ann Go – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Rebecca Trehearn – Dogfight – Southwark Playhouse
Jenna Russell – Urinetown – St. James Theatre
Zizi Strallen – Hairspray – Leicester Curve

Best Featured Actress in a New Production of a Play
Samantha Colley – The Crucible – Old Vic
Angela Lansbury – Blithe Spirit – Gielgud
Anna Carteret – Shakespeare in Love – Noel Coward Theatre
Carey Mulligan – Skylight – Wyndhams

Best Leading Actor in a New Production of a Musical
Jon Jon Briones – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward, London
Richard Fleeshman – Urinetown – St. James Theatre
Jamie Muscato – Dogfight – Southwark Playhouse
Warren Sollars – 20th Century Boy – Wimbledon

Best Leading Actor in A New Production of a Play
Richard Armitage – The Crucible – Old Vic Theatre
Martin Freeman – Richard III – Trafalgar Studios
Daniel Radcliffe – Cripple of Inishmann – Noel coward
Tom Bateman – Shakespeare In Love – Noel Coward

Best Leading Actress in a New Production of a Musical
Eva Noblezada – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Rosalie Craig – The Light Princess – National Theatre
Lucie Mae Sumner – Avenue Q – UK Tour
Jodie Prenger – Calamity Jane – Watermill Theatre

Best Leading Actress in a New Production of a Play
Anna Madeley – The Crucible – Old Vic
Angela Lansbury – Blithe Spirit – Gielgud
Gillian Anderson – A Streetcar Named Desire – The Young Vic
Billie Piper – Great Britain – National Theatre

Best Lighting Design in a New Production of a Play or Musical
Charles Balfour – Richard III – Trafalgar Studio
Adam Silverman – Urinetown – St James Theatre
Paule Constable – The Light Princess – National Theatre
Grant Anderson – The Addams Family – Assembly Hall (Edinburgh)

Best Long-Running Show in the West End
Les Miserables – Queens Theatre
Wicked – Apollo Victoria
Phantom of the Opera – Her Majesty’s Theatre
Matilda – Cambridge Theatre

Best Musical Direction (Fringe or regional)
George Dyer – Dogfight – Southwark Playhouse
John Donovan – Singin’ In The Rain – UK Tour
Ben Atkinson – Chicago – Leicester Curve
Zach Flis/Joanne Ho – The Addams Family – Assembly Hall (Edinburgh)

Best Musical Direction (West End)
Alfonso Casado Trigo – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Richard John – Dirty Rotten Scoundrels – Savoy
Martin Lowe – The Light Princess – National Theatre
Alan Williams – Urinetown – St. James Theatre

Best New Musical in the West End
Urinetown – St James Theatre
I Can’t Sing! – London Palladium
The Light Princess – National Theatre
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels – Savoy Theatre

Best New Play
Shakespeare In Love – Noel Coward Theatre
Let the Right One In – Apollo
1984 – Headlong/Almeida / Playhouse Theatre
Great Britain – National Theatre

Best New Production of a Musical (Fringe/Regions)
20th Century Boy – UK tour
Dogfight – Southwark Playhouse
Happy Days – UK tour
Sunny Afternoon – Hampstead Theatre

Best Performance in a Long-Running West End show
Carrie Hope Fletcher – Les Miserables – Queens Theatre
Gavin Creel – The Book of Mormon – Prince of Wales
Willemjin Verkaik – Wicked – Apollo Victoria Theatre
Rebecca Lock – Mamma Mia – Novello

Best Scenic Design in a New Production of a Play or Musical
Totie Driver, Matt Kinley & Adrian Vaux – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Soutra Gilmour – Richard III – Trafalgar Studios
Soutra Gilmour – Urinetown – St James Theatre
Rae Smith – The Light Princess – National Theatre

Best Sound Design in a New Production of a Play or Musical
Mick Potter – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Richard Hammarton – The Crucible – The Old Vic
Terry Jardine/Nick Lidster – Urinetown – St James Theatre
Tom Gibbons – 1984 – Headlong/Almeida/ Playhouse Theatre

Theatrical Event of the Year
West End Live – Trafalgar Square
50 Years on Stage (National Theatre) – Various Theatres
Les Mis V Phantom Charity Football Match – Bromley FC
Kerry Ellis’s return to Wicked – Apollo Victoria

Theatrical Venue of the Year
Southwark Playhouse
Donmar Warehouse
Leicester Curve Theatre
Edinburgh Playhouse

Understudy of the Year in any production of a Play or Musical
Carolyn Maitland – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre
Marc Antolin – From Here to Eternity – Shaftesbury
Emma Hatton – Wicked – Apollo Victoria theatre
Niall Sheehy – Miss Saigon – Prince Edward Theatre