Review: The Boys from Syracuse, Union Theatre

“Keep your fingers under control”

As a Rodgers and Hart musical from the late 1930s, The Boys from Syracuse is naturally full of songs you didn’t know you knew – ‘Sing for Your Supper’, ‘This Can’t Be Love’, ‘Falling in Love with Love’ – but it is also a story that you may very well be familiar with. George Abbott’s book relocates the action to Ancient Greece and refocuses it firmly onto the romantic entanglements therein but the tale is Shakespeare’s story of identical Antipholi and Dromios let loose in Ephesus – it’s a rom-Comedy of Errors, with tunes.

Ben De Wynter’s production plays to the typical strengths of the Union Theatre – pulling together a sizeable ensemble full of youthful freshness, stripping back musical arrangements to their innate simplicity and creating choreography that pushes the intimate boundaries of this fringe venue. And it mostly succeeds in these three as mistaken identities abound with the arrival of Antipholus and Dromio of Syracuse into the town of Ephesus, where their long-lost twins are in residence, causing mayhem with friends and family alike. Continue reading “Review: The Boys from Syracuse, Union Theatre”

Review: The Wizard of Oz, Palladium

“And my head I’d be scratchin’ while my thoughts were busy hatchin’

I could have quite happily given The Wizard of Oz a miss, it wasn’t ever really on my list of shows to see but the combined news of a visit from a family member who wanted to see it and Hannah Waddingham’s imminent departure from the ensemble meant that I found myself there on a Saturday evening… There’s something a little odd about its choice as Andrew Lloyd-Webber’s third reality casting show, Over the Rainbow, as the show is not really a fully-fledged musical, no matter how famous some of the songs but he persevered nonetheless. What is even odder is his assembly of a strong musical theatre cast around the eventual winner, Danielle Hope, given the paucity of many of the roles around Dorothy.

Lloyd-Webber’s way around this has been to write new songs, with long-standing lyricist Tim Rice, to beef up the roles of characters like the Wizard and the Wicked Witch of the West and justify the casting of Michael Crawford and Hannah Waddingham respectively. But despite looking a picture with some tricksy staging and wirework, the end result is curiously banal, exceedingly bland and one which rarely excited me. The focus is so much on the stagecraft that the heart of the story is rarely engaged: Hope’s Dorothy is sweet but rarely interesting, there’s little of the ‘star quality’ evident this evening but then the role is not one that really encourages it; Michael Crawford made very little impact either as the Wizard or the cameos as Ozians and so it went, emotion taking second-place to spectacle. Continue reading “Review: The Wizard of Oz, Palladium”

Re-Review: Sister Act with Whoopi Goldberg, Palladium

“I had a revelation when I skipped my medication”

One of the cardinal rules of theatre booking is that you should never book to see a show just to see a particular performer as that road can only lead to disappointment. And so it came to be when I booked a return visit to Sister Act The Musical when it was announced that Whoopi Goldberg would be covering the role of Mother Superior for most of August for the sole reason of seeing her rather than any desire to see the show again. With the sad news of her mother taking very ill, Whoopi was forced to cut her run short and return to the US and so I ended up giving my tickets to a friend.

But the world works in mysterious ways and I clearly had some good karma stored up so when I booked the shows on my Groupon deal (including this one as I had decided to give it a whirl again since it had announced it was closing in advance of a move to Broadway and also to make way for The Wizard of Oz) and was randomly allocated a date, it just so happened to coincide with Goldberg’s return to the show for just 5 performances. Continue reading “Re-Review: Sister Act with Whoopi Goldberg, Palladium”