TV Review: Bodyguard Series 1

Bodyguard reaches a thrilling climax that is sure to disappoint some but left me on the edge of my seat

“I wanted to know who did it, I don’t know who did it”

Except we do finally know who did it. Jed Mercurio’s Bodyguard – an unexpected massive hit and a reminder that the appointment-to-view model is far from over – reached its climax tonight in typically high-tension style, confounding expectations to the end and dashing the dreams of many a conspiracy theorist to boot. Seriously, so glad that Julia Montague remained dead (at least until a sequel is announced and we have to go through this whole farrago again). 

And though it is bound to have its detractors, I have to say I found it all hugely entertaining. If it just wasn’t realistic enough for you, then WTF are you doing watching dramas? If you’re getting swept up in locations in this fictionalised version of London not being where they are in real life, turn the damn thing off! Its not for everyone, that’s absolutely fine, but you don’t have to drag everyone else down with your misery. Continue reading “TV Review: Bodyguard Series 1”

Film Review: Their Finest

“He is an actor. Unless you have reviewed him, had intercourse with him, or done both simultaneously, he won’t remember you”

With Gemma Arterton doing a Welsh accent and some wistful crying, Rachael Stirling as a fearsome, elegant-trouser-wearing lesbian with a fabulous line in repartee, Bill Nighy being Bill Nighy, and the subject being women working in wartime, Their Finest is pretty much tailor-made for my interests, it even has bonus Helen McCrory in it for God’s sake! But even without all that box-ticking, it is a gently, most enjoyable film.

Adapted by Gaby Chiappe from Lissa Evans’s novel Their Finest Hour and a Half, and directed by Lone Scherfig, the story follows a British Ministry of Information film team making a morale-boosting film about the Dunkirk evacuation during the Battle of Britain and the London Blitz. So it’s a film about making films, the romance and realities of the business, with the added spin of it being set in wartime. Continue reading “Film Review: Their Finest”

Support new musical theatre writing – The Wicker Husband

“She sang a melody of the hope of the springtime

It’s not often that you’ll find me championing the cause of puppetry on here but in The Wicker Husband, a new folk musical based on an original short story by Ursula Wills-Jones, we just have such a thing. With book and story by Rhys Jennings and music and lyrics by Darren Clark, The Wicker Husband will be an unconventional musical combining puppetry, folk music and dance to weave the tale of an Ugly Girl and her understanding of the cruel world she lives in. It is the story the Outsider, of self-acceptance in a society that tells us what it is to be “Ugly”.

And if that sounds like your cup of tea, then you’re in luck. As the guys launched an online crowdfunding campaign for further development of the project and as it stands, have reached well over a third of their target. In the cutthroat world of commercial theatre, especially musical theatre, you have to admire the determination of the creative team, bolstered by director/dramaturg Charlotte Westernra, in finding alternative ways to develop their work. The campaign is scheduled to end on 2nd April and it would be fantastic to see them reach their goals so watch the story-so-far video below and then head over to http://bit.ly/wickerhusband to see the range of incentives to help you make your mind up on how much you want to donate! Continue reading “Support new musical theatre writing – The Wicker Husband”