Review: Tartuffe, National Theatre

Denis O’Hare shines as Tartuffe in Blanche McIntyre’s directorial debut at the National Theatre

“We don’t have orgies here, this is Highgate”

The lure of the guru is one which has always been strong for the rich and powerful and from Rasputin to Steve Hilton, there’s always some long-haired, barefoot chancer to ready step in. This partly explains why Molière’s Tartuffe remains so popular today and also why it is so ripe for adaptation, as it done here in this new version by John Donnelly, directed by Blanche McIntyre in her National Theatre debut (and how to marvellous to see her here, I’ve been a fan since her days at the Finborough).

Relocated to a hyper-rich, modern-day Highgate – Robert Jones’ opulent design is full of the type of wonderful pieces of furniture you normally only see in shop windows on the King’s Road – Orgon’s family have become concerned at his increasing devotion to his new guru figure Tartuffe. And in Denis O’Hare’s hand, you can see why – he’s quite the charismatic chancer, he spends the pre-show roaming the auditorium giving out flowers and affirmations even though it may, at first glance, just look like someone has come in off the street. Continue reading “Review: Tartuffe, National Theatre”

Review: Dinner With Friends, Park

“The key to civilization is to fight the impulse to just chuck it all”

For so long Michael Spence in Holby City, Hari Dhillon’s ventures onto the stage have been sparse indeed but it’s clear that he has high standards – Pulitzer Prize-winning plays about middle-class dinner parties. 2013 saw him take on Ayad Akthar’s Disgraced (2013 winner) for the Bush and then Broadway and now he stars in Donald Margulies’ Dinner With Friends (2000 winner) for the Park for director Tom Attenborough.

It’s a tale of marriage and mid-life crises – Gabe and Karen are happily, well smugly, married but their satisfied outlook is shaken when the relationship of their friends Tom and Beth crumbles in front of them. Interestingly, Margulies explores what happens to the people in the middle of break-ups, especially when they’re mates with both parties. Beth has got there first, announcing the split at a dinner at Gabe and Karen’s, but Tom soon turns up to get his side across. Continue reading “Review: Dinner With Friends, Park”

Review: Disgraced, Bush

“You haven’t read the Quran, but you’ve read a couple of sanctimonious British bullies and you think you know something about Islam?”

Credit where credit is due (but be warned, this bit of praise will involve a spoiler), Nadia Fall’s production of Disgraced at the Bush Theatre contains one of the most brutally effective and well-staged pieces of stage violence I have ever seen and fight director Kate Waters ought to be commended for it. Too often we mock poorly executed scuffles without really taking into account how tricky it can be to make it convincing and here, it is so well done that the image seared itself into my brain, working its way into a dream I had that night! 

But to the play at hand – Ayad Akhtar won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for Disgraced and a quick scan of its key scene might suggest he played to his audience just a little. A lapsed Muslim lawyer and his white artist wife have friends over dinner, a black female law colleague whose partner is a Jewish art dealer and over fennel and anchovy salad, they explosively debate religion, politics and cultural stereotypes. But the play is more than just Pulitzer-bait, digging into just how deeply faith and upbringing shape our identities and how we carry them through life no matter how one might try to reinvent oneself. Continue reading “Review: Disgraced, Bush”