2018 Best Supporting Actress in a Play + in a Musical

Best Supporting Actress in a Play

Cecilia Noble, Nine Night
A peach of a role for this most characterful of performers, Noble fits Aunt Maggie so well the part could have been written for her. And as with Nine Night at large, the beauty is in the simultaneous specificity and universality of the character. Though rooted entirely in Jamaican traditions, she’s also the archetype of the opinionated elderly relative that is recognisable no matter where you come from and Noble imbues her with just enough heart to go along with the hilarity. 

Honourable mention: Martha Plimpton, Sweat
A late but indisputable arrival, the ferocity with which Plimpton permeates her performance makes an already excellent production into something unmissable. Obviously it helps that she’s an iconic figure from my childhood movie days but seriously, do what you can to see her at the Donmar.

Adjoa Andoh, Leave Taking
Eva Feiler, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Watermill)
Penny Layden, Jellyfish
Lashana Lynch, ear for eye
Charity Wakefield, Emilia

8-10
Lucy Cohu, The Height of the Storm; Sylvestra Le Touzel, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie; Kayla Meikle, Dance Nation

 

Best Supporting Actress in a Musical

Patti LuPone, Company
A triumphant return to the West End stage for this most iconic of performers whose every mmm-hmm turns another theatregoer into a homosexual. Every time I’ve seen the show, her interpretation of ‘Ladies Who Lunch’ has brought different colours and textures – and check the moment when her eyes pin down Bobbie with “the girls who just watch”. Plus she does furniture-shuffling choreography like a real trouper – a privilege to watch (and watch again).

Honourable mention: Amber Gray, Hadestown
I’d thought LuPone would walk this category but the elemental force with which Gray blew onto the Olivier stage had me in raptures as her every move and utterance had me absolutely gripped. Is there any way we can keep her in the UK or entice her back as soon as possible please.

Naana Agyei-Ampadu, Caroline or Change
Vivien Carter, Sweet Charity (Watermill)
Genevieve McCarthy, Mythic
Hilary MacLean, Sunshine on Leith
Seyi Omooba, Christina Modestou & Renée Lamb, Little Shop of Horrors

8-10
Cherelle Skeete, Fun Home; Susannah van den Berg, Once; Vicky Vox, Little Shop of Horrors

Review: Sunshine on Leith, West Yorkshire Playhouse

As unlikely a Proclaimers musical may seem, this gorgeous production of Sunshine on Leith at West Yorkshire Playhouse is probably the best thing I’ve seen this year

“Your beauty and kindness
Made tears clear my blindness”

Is a jukebox musical still a jukebox musical when you don’t know most of the songs? You feel that most people would be hard pressed to name more than two songs by The Proclaimers and so it is part of the genius of Stephen Greenhorn (writer) and James Brining (commissioner and director) that they managed to fashion something so perfect, that somehow still feels so familiar, from the back catalogue of the Edinburgh brothers.

Sunshine on Leith was first seen at the Dundee Rep in 2007 and though it has toured Scotland a few times since, it has rarely been seen south of the border. So who else to revive it but Brining himself for West Yorkshire Playhouse. And what a straight-up, fantastic success it is. London has seen its fair share of big musicals open this month but none have made me cry, never mind feel so much as this. Continue reading “Review: Sunshine on Leith, West Yorkshire Playhouse”

DVD Review: Torchwood – Children of Earth

“It’s the children…”

Well I don’t think anyone saw that coming. A darker spin-off from Doctor Who that took a little while to find its feet in its first couple of years, the third series of Torchwood – sub-titled Children of Earth – saw the show graduate to BBC1 (all the more impressive given its original BBC3 origins) with a 5-parter of some considerable drama that pushed the boundaries of anything previously shown in the Whoniverse (apologies for that word!) And though it is here due to being one of the first times that Lucy Cohu entered my consciousness, I was pleasantly surprised to find it populated with actors that I have latterly come to admire – Ian Gelder and Cush Jumbo in particular.

Children of Earth was so successful for me because although its main premise is rooted in the sci-fi world – a mysterious alien presence arrives on Earth, seizing control of the minds of all its children and demanding their sacrifice – so much of the conflict comes from the human drama, the moral ambiguities that arise as times of crisis require difficult decision making. And having established a Spooks-like level of turnover with its cast with the Series 2 finale, it added another, even crueller, twist of the screw, made all the more distressing for its unassuming nature. Continue reading “DVD Review: Torchwood – Children of Earth”