Review: Hello Harry! A Celebration of 40 Years at Stage Door

Just a quickie for the infusion of pure joy that was Hello Harry! A Celebration of 40 Years at Stage Door

Amid the constant shower of shit that passes for news about theatre at the moment, this online concert to celebrate the incredible 40 year career of Harry Gabriel, the Shaftesbury Theatre’s Stage Door Keeper, was an absolute ray of sunshine.

Put together by Giles Terera, the guest list was truly astonishing, featuring a veritable who’s who of the theatre world, all connected one way or another with Harry through the 40 years of shows he has seen pass through the Shaftesbury Theatre. Continue reading “Review: Hello Harry! A Celebration of 40 Years at Stage Door”

News: even more black MT talent turning it up for TURN UP!

Theatrical superstars Sharon D. Clarke, Noma Dumezweni, Clive Rowe, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Johnnie Fiore, Brenda Edwards, Zaris-Angel Hator, Rachel Adedeji, Aisha Jawando, Norm Lewis, Brittney Johnson, Brandi Chavonne Massey and Joe Aaron Reid and more join the lineup for TURN UP! , a live stream event supporting the Black Lives Matter movement.

The live stream event is streaming for The Bail Project, The Okra Project, The Black Curriculum and UK Black Pride – in support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

TURN UP! will stream on Friday 10th, Saturday 11th and Sunday 12th July at 7.30pm prompt.  The performance streamed on Sunday 12th July will be captioned. Tickets cost £10 for one stream/show, or you can watch all 3 nights for £25, all profit (after streaming costs and applicable taxes) will be split between our four charities, tickets are available now from club11.london/turn. Continue reading “News: even more black MT talent turning it up for TURN UP!”

Review: Collective Rage – A Play in Five Betties, Southwark Playhouse

“My PUSSY is not gonna do the acting. 
I am gonna do the acting. 
In THE THEA-TAH.”

As Collective Rage‘s sub-title suggests, there’s a whole lotta Betty in Jen Silverman’s play. From an Upper East Sider unhappy with her husband to a disillusioned Latina, a younger woman also unhappy with her husband to a genderqueer ex-con via a lesbian would-be mechanic, it turns out – in some ways – we are all Betty, #JeSuisBetty, #BettysArmy.

For these five particular and very different Betties though, being brought together by the power of theatre provides an opportunity to explore something more about their Bettiness. They investigate hidden desires, bristle at others’ ambitions, discover the power of their own vagina in one case, and with a raucous, drag cabaret inspired vibe, is punchily energetic.  
Continue reading “Review: Collective Rage – A Play in Five Betties, Southwark Playhouse”

Review: The Sunshine Boys, Savoy

“If I was there to enjoy it, I’d buy a ticket”

This new production of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys might be considered one of the hottest tickets of the summer, featuring as it does the West End debut of Danny De Vito and the return to the stage of Richard Griffiths. The tale is of Willie Clarke and Al Lewis, a long-suffering former vaudeville comedy act whose relationship over the 40 years of their career deteriorated so badly that they didn’t even to speak to each other off-stage for the final year. But when a television network decides to put on a comedy retrospective more than a decade later and call on Lewis and Clarke to reprise their schtick one more time, it seems that old animosities are still fresh in the mind of some.

I saw the show in preview (and I have to say I find it a little cheeky to have a 3 week preview period for something clearly advertised as a limited 12 week run) and the best thing I could say about it was the amount of room for improvement. Thea Sharrock’s production felt extremely lethargic, especially in the interminable first half, with much more zip and zing needed by all concerned. De Vito’s bitterly retired Clark plods a little too much and needs more connection with his environment, especially with his nephew and hapless agent Ben, a hard-working Adam Levy, who is pushing for the reunion. And when Griffiths finally arrives on the scene, the cantankerousness is palpable but this just isn’t paired with any sense of the history between the characters. Continue reading “Review: The Sunshine Boys, Savoy”

Review: Vernon God Little, Young Vic

“This is the first time we’ve had a high school massacre in Monteiro”

The first of what will now be three revivals of their own productions in 2011, Vernon God Little returns to the Young Vic having launched Colin Morgan (more familiar as BBC1’s Merlin these days) in his debut role whilst still at drama school. This time, it is Joseph Drake who takes on the title role, fresh out of the Bristol Old Vic theatre school. This is a review of the preview performance on Tuesday 1st February.

Vernon God Little is an adaptation by Tanya Ronder of DBC Pierre’s Booker Prize-winning novel, telling the story of Vernon Gregory Little, a fifteen year old boy trapped deep in small-town Texas. When his best friend snaps and carries out a school shooting leaving sixteen dead, the rapacious television media coverage encourages the public in the search for someone to blame and their gaze lands on Vernon. Things then worse for him as opportunistic people seize their own chances for a glory at his expense and then they get a whole lot worse. Continue reading “Review: Vernon God Little, Young Vic”