TV Review: The Hollow Crown – The Wars of the Roses: 1. Henry VI Part 2

“I was a woeful looker-on”

On a night when the real drama was unfolding in Stockholm’s Globen arena and the main internecine conflict was between the juries of music professionals and the public vote as revealed by the new counting mechanism, the BBC’s decision to schedule The Hollow Crown against the Eurovision Song Contest didn’t work for me. Last week’s Henry VI Part 1 was a great reintroduction into these quality adaptations as it started the new series but the follow-up doesn’t quite match the same level.

Part of the issue lies in the seemingly accepted wisdom that the Henry VI plays are problems that need solving – I’ve still not managed to see a conventional production of the trilogy to use as a benchmark – and so the plays are often abandoned to the mercies of the vision of writers and directors. Such is the case with The Wars of the Roses: 1. Henry VI Part 2, chopped down and frantically paced, there’s a whole lot of fury but just not enough feeling (though if you’re a fan of battlefields and decapitated heads, you might fare better than I did). Continue reading “TV Review: The Hollow Crown – The Wars of the Roses: 1. Henry VI Part 2”

Review: The Picture of John Gray, Old Red Lion

“We are living in an age of unrivalled beastliness” 

The life of Oscar Wilde has been much explored, not least in the theatre with De Profundis and The Judas Kiss just two recent examples, but CJ Wilmann’s new play The Picture of John Gray takes a different angle on the familiar events by focusing on others who were in his circle and how they were affected by the scandal that engulfed the writer and eventually claimed his life. The fresh-faced and devout poet John Gray was one of those men, a lover of Wilde’s and reportedly the inspiration for the character of Dorian Gray, and Wilmann’s play adroitly explores this slice of gay life anew.

Though Wilde is oft mentioned, he never actually appears here, his presence is merely felt and as Patrick Walshe McBride’s youthful Gray burns brightly and briefly in Oscar’s life, he spends more and more time in The Vale, the artist’s studio of couple Charles Ricketts and Charles Shannon that formed the salon for the group. There, his head is turned by the French Jewish literary critic Marc-André Raffalovich and an intense relationship forms between the two, right at the moment that the Bosie-led scandal explodes and lands Wilde in court and then in jail. Continue reading “Review: The Picture of John Gray, Old Red Lion”

Review: East of Berlin, Southwark Playhouse

 
“You’ll like this part…”

In a year full of military commemorations, the Southwark Playhouse once again turns its focus onto the aftermath of war but where the extraordinary Johnny Got His Gun asked us to consider ‘what next’ for the soldiers once they stopped fighting, Canadian playwright Hannah Moscovitch’s East of Berlin looks at the impact on the next generation, the children of those directly involved in the Second World War.

Specifically, Rudi is the son of an SS doctor at Auschwitz, a Nazi war criminal now in hiding in Paraguay with his family, who have kept Rudi in the dark about his father’s past which he only discovers as a teenager. Upon this revelation, he flees back to Berlin and builds himself an anonymous new life but the weight of the past and the huge questions of guilt and responsibility hang heavily over him, especially once he finds love with an American Jewish woman.  Continue reading “Review: East of Berlin, Southwark Playhouse”