2017 Best Supporting Actress in a Play + in a Musical

Best Supporting Actress in a Play

Bríd Brennan, The Ferryman

Thinking about this most well-received of plays, it is the role of Aunt Maggie Faraway who lingers most in my mind, the elegiac beauty of her speeches an elegant way of folding in traditions of Irish storytelling and emphasising the deep bonds of family. Breathtaking work from Brennan.

Honourable mention: Kate Kennedy, Twelfth Night (Royal Exchange)
When done well, Olivia is one of my favourite Shakespearean roles and the statuesque Kennedy didn’t disappoint with a highly-sexed take on the character which embraced all the physical potential of her height.

Sheila Atim, Girl From the North Country
Laura Carmichael, Apologia
Romola Garai, Queen Anne
Lashana Lynch, a profoundly affectionate, passionate devotion to someone (-noun)
Kate O’Flynn, The Glass Menagerie

8-10
Susan Brown, Angels in America; Jessica Brown Findlay, Hamlet; Denise Gough, Angels in America

Best Supporting Actress in a Musical

Tracie Bennett, Follies

All I have to say is ‘I’m Still Here’. I’M STILL HERE!

Honourable mention: Rachel John, Hamilton
Only the tiniest of margins separated these two and it’s only really the fact that she’s not Renée Elise Goldsberry that held John back from the title.

Christine Allado, Hamilton
Julie Atherton, The Grinning Man
Sharon D Clarke, The Life
Joanna Riding, Romantics Anonymous
Lucie Shorthouse, Everybody’s Talking About Jamie


8-10
Nicola Hughes, Caroline or Change ; Cathy Read, Little Women; Sharon Sexton, Bat Out of Hell

Review: The Grinning Man, Trafalgar Studios

 “A tale so tragic it could only be true”

I’m no real fan of the Trafalgar Studios to be honest – its seating can be cramped, its angles severe, the toilet situation far from ideal, plus the coffee machine there takes an inordinate amount of time to produce a drink. But credit where it is due, director Tom Morris and designer Jon Bausor have done a fantastically inventive job in reconceiving the space to suit the anarchic energy of The Grinning Man, first seen in Bristol last year (and my favourite musical of the year, too).

A new British musical (book by Carl Grose, music by Tim Phillips and Marc Teitler, lyrics by all three plus Morris) based on a Victor Hugo novel, it’s a macabre tale to be sure, but one suffused with a real magic too. And Morris gives it an immediacy which scrubs away much of the distance that audiences can feel in the old Whitehall Theatre as cellists appear through walls, performers clamber into the stalls to sing, couples walk as if on air…

Set in an alternate historical England, the story revolves around Grinpayne, mutilated as a child and now forced to work in a travelling puppet show with his adoptive family. The sight of the ‘smile’ carved into his face causes rapture in many who witness it and once the royal family catch wind of the new show in town, Grinpayne’s destiny changes forever along with the blind lovers, domesticated wolves, unruly princesses, and vicious manservants who swirl around him.

Louis Maskell is just superb as the psychologically as well as as physically scarred Grinpayne and his malleable voice suits the unconventional mood of the score well, especially in songs like ‘Labyrinth’. The instrumentation is very much left-of-centre but these tunes have a way of burrowing themselves into the psyche, (I found I remembered several even now, a year down the line). And as the nightmarishly charismatic narrator of sorts, Julian Bleach’s Barkilphedro is wickedly enjoyable, both underscoring how much they deserved their fosterIAN awards.

Of the new cast members, it’s a joy to see Julie Atherton on the stage once again, this time as the self-possessed queen-in-waiting Angelica, and Mark Anderson’s Lord Dirry-Moir is delectably delightful as he deals with the tangled web of his emotions. There’s superlative work from Gyre & Gimble’s puppetry, Loren O’Dair and James Alexander-Taylor’s work with the wolf is exceptional, and the whole show is just as satisfying and challenging and complex and beautiful as I remembered. Recommended.

Running time: 2 hours 45 minutes (with interval)
Photos: Helen Maybanks
Booking until 17th February

 

 

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Review: Songs and Solidarity, Trafalgar Studios

“We could see this was a bad one immediately. The sky was glowing.”
Touted as an evening of song, dance and poetry, Songs and Solidarity was a remarkable event indeed. A fundraising gala evening pulled together in the space of a week by the superhuman efforts of actor Giles Terera and producer Danielle Tarento, it was a concert for the hundreds of families made homeless and the relatives of those who lost their lives in the Grenfell Tower fire. Hosted by Claire Sweeney, musically directed by the enormously talented Tim Sutton, 
The balance of the programme was just right too. From pure musical loveliness like the gentle harmonies of Tyrone Huntley and Jon Robyns on Cyndi Lauper’s ‘True Colors’ and the simplicity of Rachel Tucker’s acapella take on ‘She Moved Through The Fair’, to the more intense emotion of Terera’s own ‘Ol’ Man River’ and a visibly moved Clare Foster’s ‘Don’t Worry About Me’ (a song with which I wasn’t familiar but rather destroyed me). From the much-needed comic relief of Stiles & Drewe skipping through ‘A Little Bit of Nothing On A Big White Plate’ to the soul-warming ‘Indiscriminate Acts Of Kindness’ performed by the ever excellent Julie Atherton.
The more stirring emotional moments came from those performers talking about their more personal connection to the tragedy. Musician Earl Okin spoke movingly about living in the shadow of the tower itself before a stunning version of Billie Holiday’s ‘God Bless The Child’, polymath Rikki Beadle-Blair turned his experience of being evicted from his own tower block into something akin to performance art before an impassioned ‘Change Is Gonna Come’, Mark Thomas had us in tears of laughter with his comedy set before expertly twisting the knife with his fervent defence of public servants, particularly the firefighters whom he had visited just to say thank you.
Musical numbers were interspersed with powerful extracts of verbatim testimony from some of the survivors of the fire, read by the likes of Nikki Amuka-Bird, Rakhee Thakrar and Vikesh Bhai, even Dame Judi Dench got in on the action with a recording. But for me, the most memorable part of the evening came with Noma Dumezweni’s recital of this Facebook post from a firefighter who attended Grenfell. Gently asking us to close our eyes and to consider this a radio play, it was a sobering reminder of exactly what we ask of our much beleaguered emergency services and of the scale of the tragedy which should not, can not, must not be forgotten.
It was also instructive and inspirational to hear from Eartha Pond, the Queens Park councillor who set up this GoFundMe page to help provide a focal point for support and whose tireless efforts on the ground to help those affected by the fire are being fitted around the responsibilities of her day job. In the words of Heather Small, a surprise addition to the bill, ‘what have you done today to make yourself feel proud?’ Well, you can still donate money and if you are quick, you can also still participate in the silent auction (entries close on Friday 30th). 

Programme
Had I A Golden Thread – Alexia Khadime
Total Praise – West End Gospel Choir
We’ve Lost Everything – Vikesh Bhai
True Colors – Tyrone Huntley and Jon Robyns
I Said Listen, We Have To Go Back – Nikki Amuka-Bird
Natural Woman – Cassidy Janson
Extract from The Hotel Cerise and Still I Rise by Maya Angelou – Bonnie Greer 
God Bless The Child – Earl Okin
Your Face – The Olai Collier Company feat. Caitlin Taylor and Ayden Morgan
Mark Thomas
Change Is Gonna Come – Rikki Beadle-Blair, accompanied by Jami Reid Quarrell
Ol’ Man River – Giles Terera
She Moved Through The Fair – Rachel Tucker
Wind Beneath My Wings – Rachel Tucker

A Little Bit of Nothing On A Big White Plate – Stiles & Drewe
One Thing I’ll Say, I’m Proud Of The Young People – Rakhee Thakrar
Don’t Worry About Me – Clare Foster
It’s Not About Muslim Or Christian – Nikki Amuka-Bird
Redemption Song – Tyrone Huntley
Indiscriminate Acts Of Kindness – Julie Atherton, accompanied by Curtis Volp
The Fire Fighter – Noma Dumezweni
Life Is Just A Bowl Of Cherries – Claire Sweeney
Sweet Thing – David McAlmont accompanied by Curtis Slapper
Proud – Heather Small
You’ve Got A Friend – Cassidy Janson and Company

News: Songs and Solidarity – a concert for those affected by the Grenfell Tower fire

Adding to the fundraising efforts already established, actor Giles Terera and producer Danielle Tarento have put together a theatrically inclined evening of song, dance and comedy in aid of those affected by the Grenfell Tower fire.

Songs and Solidarity takes place on Sunday 25 June at 7.30pm, and will feature performances from West End stars including Olivier Award-winner Noma Dumezweni, Rachel Tucker (Wicked), Tyrone Huntley (Dreamgirls), Clare Foster (Travesties), Cassidy Janson (Beautiful) and Alexia Khadime (The Book of Mormon).

They will be joined by a host of performers and comedians including Julie Atherton, Nikki Amuka-Bird, Jon Robyns, Jason Manford, Mark Thomas, Stiles and Drewe, Rikki Beadle-Blair, Vikash Bhai, Bonnie Greer, David McAlmont, Omar F Okai Company, Earl Okin, Claire Sweeney, Rakhee Thakrar, Gok Wan and the West End Gospel Choir.

The concert will also feature contributions from Dame Judi Dench, and Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda.


Talking about the event, Terera said:

“I’m sure for all of us our immediate response is to want to try and reach out and help, either as an individual or collectively. The community that has suffered this horror has always been a strong, close knit, diverse, creative one. As an artistic community we aim for those same values. 

“At the same time it is a community which has been marginalised and ignored for a very long time. So as well as the vital response of trying to contribute financially and materially we have an opportunity to come together stand in solidarity with those directly affected and say this should not have happened.”



Proceeds from the concert, which will also feature a silent auction with theatre-related lots, will go to
the Grenfell Tower Fire Fund set up by Eartha Pond.

Songs and Solidarity takes place at Trafalgar Studios on Sunday 25 June at 7.30pm

Review: Ordinary Days, London Theatre Workshop

“If everyone’s got a big picture

How come my picture’s something that I still have yet to see?”
I saw Adam Gwon’s 2008 musical Ordinary Days downstairs at the Trafalgar Studios back in 2011 with a grand cast that included Julie Atherton, Alexia Khadime and Daniel Boys and enjoyed it a fair bit, so news of a new production by Streetlights, People! at the transplanted London Theatre Workshop (now in the City) was glad tidings indeed. Directed by Jen Coles on the simplest of sets, decorated with a Manhattan skyline by Samantha Cates, the show’s relatable charms shine through once again.
The four-hander is a deceptively simple show – a quartet of 20-something New Yorkers are spiritually lost, swept up in what should be the romance of the city but finding that adulting isn’t quite as easy as all that. Jason is sacrificing everything for the woman he loves but Claire’s previously broken heart just won’t heal properly; grad student Deb has lost months of valuable thesis research but when struggling artist Warren finds it, she stubbornly resists any attempt at connection that he makes.
So far so rom-com but Gwon’s trick is to spike his narratives with a quirkily idiosyncratic dose of real life. So the meet-cute at the Met is ruined by Deb’s dislike for art galleries and her generally caustic manner, vividly encapsulated in Nora Perone’s delightfully scornful performance. And something more moving thus comes out of the slow-burning friendship that emerges with Neil Cameron’s appealingly nerdish Warren, acknowledging that it can be that much harder to make friends in a city and that it can be worthwhile.
Set against them, Claire and Jason’s relationship drama is a little more bittersweet as doubt creeps into their happiness, Kirby Hughes (so good that she gave me goosebumps within 10 seconds of starting to sing) and Alistair Frederick both sparkling as they each figure out exactly what it is they’re fighting for. Director Coles keeps the action moving pacily around the space, evoking something of the claustrophobic unfriendliness of metropolitan hustle and bustle and musical director Rowland Braché leads intelligently from the piano. 
If proof were needed that Gwon is a composer you should reckon with, that legendary supporter of musical theatre old and new Audra McDonald included one of his songs on her album Go Back Home. That song ‘I’ll Be Here’ is an epic story in miniature and Hughes smashes it out of the park here with a beautifully restrained show of real emotion. And if a touch of sentimentality creeps into the final moments, it’s hard to argue that it hasn’t been earned by this depiction of the extraordinary that can be found in the ordinary.
Running time: 75 minutes (with interval)
Photos: Natalie Lomako
Booking until 17th June

Festive news #1: West End Up Close… at Christmas

‘Tis the season for goodwill to all, and proving most generous with their time are various sets of musical theatre performers who are doing all sorts of charitable endeavours this December. First up are the guys at Relative Motion have just announced West End Up Close… at Christmas, their third concert in partnership with The House of St Barnabas, a charity and members’ club in the heart of Soho.

After sold-out concerts earlier this year with Jodie Jacobs and Julie Atherton, this festive concert will take place on Wednesday 14th December at 7.30pm feature the amazing talents of Madalena Alberto, Julie Atherton, Julie Jupp, Joshua LeClair, Nigel Richards and George Ure as they bring some of their favourite songs and seasonal classics to the Chapel of St Barnabas in an intimate, acoustic concert, musically directed by James 

Taylor.

Members of the audience are invited to join them pre-show for complimentary mulled wine in the Garden Room and are encouraged to stay and enjoy the members’ bar at The House of St Barnabas post-show. All proceeds from the evening will go directly towards supporting HoSB’s Employment Academy.

The House of St Barnabas is a charity pledging to break the cycle of homelessness and social exclusion in London. They run a social enterprise, a not-for- profit members’ club, to help the people they support back into lasting paid work. Their Employment Academy offers accredited qualifications, on-site work experience, real job opportunities and mentoring. The House of St Barnabas are seeking to redefine the notion of a members’ club, to challenge stereotypes around the idea of exclusivity and to create a different kind of membership. The club is a creative, socially conscious and vibrant space.
Tickets: £30 (all proceeds go to support the Employment Academy at The House of St Barnabas) available at http://bit.ly/WestEndUpCloseXmas

Round-up of summer album reviews

To cover the holiday period, you may have noticed an album review or three – here’s a round-up of them, including my top ten.

Recommended titles
Close To You – Bacharach Reimagined (2016 Original London Cast Recording)
Hamilton (2015 Original Broadway Cast Recording)
Kelli O’Hara – Always 
Leslie Odom Jr – Leslie Odom Jr 
Matt Doyle – Uncontrolled
Samantha Barks – Samantha Barks
Thérèse Raquin (2014 Original London Cast Recording)
The Last Five Years (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
The Scottsboro Boys (2014 Original London Cast Recording)
Waitress (Original Broadway Cast Recording)


And the rest!
Alison Jiear – Inspirational
Allegro (2009 First Complete Recording)
An American Victory (2016 Concept Album)
Annie (1995 London Studio Cast Recording)
Annie (2014 Film Cast)
Bad Girls (2007 Original London Cast)
Billy Porter – At The Corner of Broadway and Soul
Billy Porter – Billy’s Back On Broadway
Brian Stokes Mitchell – Simply Broadway
Bright Star (Original Broadway Cast Recording)
Bring It On: The Musical (2012 Original Broadway Cast Recording)
Caroline Sheen – Raise the Curtain 
Cheyenne Jackson – I’m Blue, Skies
Cheyenne Jackson – Renaissance
Cool Rider (Original Studio Recording)
Departure Lounge (Original London Cast Recording)
Elf the Musical (2015 Original London Cast Recording)
From Here To Eternity (2014 Live Cast Recording)
Funny Girl (2016 London Cast Recording)
Ghost The Musical (Original London Cast Recording)
In The Heights (2008 Original Broadway Cast Recording)
Jane Krakowski – The Laziest Gal in Town
John Owen-Jones – Unmasked 
Kimberley Walsh – Centre Stage
Kinky Boots (Original Broadway Cast Recording)
Kristin Chenoweth – Coming Home 
Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill (2014 Cast Recording)
Lord of the Rings (2008 Original London Cast Recording)
Louise Dearman – Here Comes The Sun 
Louise Dearman – You and I 
Love Birds (Original Edinburgh Cast Recording)
Mamma Mia (Original Cast Recording 1999)
Mrs Henderson Presents (Original London Cast Recording)
Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812
Oliver Tompsett –Sentimental Heart
Our First Mistake – The Songs of Kerrigan and Lowdermilk
Out Of Context: The Songs Of Michael Patrick Walker
Patti LuPone – Far Away Places
Patti LuPone – Matters of the Heart
Prodigy (Original Cast Recording)
Promises, Promises (2010 New Broadway Cast Recording)
Rebecca Caine – Leading Ladies 
Renée Elise Goldsberry – Beautiful EP 
Richard Beadle – Songs 
Ruthie Henshall – The Ruthie Henshall Album
Sally Ann Triplett – Anything Goes
She Loves Me (1994 London Cast Recording)
She Loves Me (2016 Broadway Cast Recording)
Stephen Ward (2013 Original Cast Recording)
Shuffle Along, Or…
The Bodyguard – The Musical (World Premiere Cast Recording)
The Color Purple (2006 Original Broadway Cast Recording)
The Color Purple (2015 Broadway Revival Cast Recording)
The Fix (1997 Original London Cast)
The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess (2012 New Broadway Cast Recording)
The Mystery of Edwin Drood (2012 Broadway Cast Recording)
Thirteen Stories Down – The Songs of Jonathan Reid Gealt
Tony Yazbeck – The Floor Above Me
Tuck Everlasting (2016 Original Broadway Cast Recording)
Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (2011 Original Broadway Cast Recording)
Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (2015 Original London Cast Recording)
Xanadu (2007 Original Broadway Cast)

CD Review: Richard Beadle – Songs (2012)

“If we make it through together”


Songs was the debut album from Richard Beadle, a songwriter, composer and conductor of television and production music, as well as a well-established musical supervisor/director on a wide range of West End shows from Betty Blue Eyes, The Bodyguard to the forthcoming The Girls. I actually attended a concert showcasing Beadle’s music back in 2013 but it has taken me a little time to get round to properly listening to the album.

His style seems to sit somewhere equidistant between ‘traditional’ and ‘new’ musical theatre writing – the nervy angst of ‘The Wedding Song’, sung perfectly by Julie Atherton, owes a debt to Jason Robert Brown whereas Rachael Wooding’s beautiful declaration of love in ‘Here We Are’ has a much more classic feel to it. And what comes across these 12 tracks is a pleasing sense of confidence in musicality, these are songs that stand as well individually as in the musicals from which they come.

For me, the quirky humorous side of his writing doesn’t quite click as firmly. Atherton’s ‘I Want A Footballer’ and Jon Boydon’s ‘Hazy in the Morning Light’ are almost too well written to cut loose enough to match the would-be raucous lyrical content and so don’t prove memorable. Beadle’s strength comes from his balladry – Louise Dearman hits two home runs with ‘My Man’ and ‘Forever Young’ and the album’s highlight comes with the haunting ‘1967’ featuring the immense talent of Septa Unella herself Hannah Waddingham.


CD Review: Thérèse Raquin (2014 Original London Cast)

“You are not still, you are not still Thérèse”

There are times when listening to cast recordings can sometimes feel like a chore, and others when they are a glorious reminder of shows gone by. For me, hearing the utterly gorgeous waterfall of voices on ‘You Are Not Still Thérèse’ from Craig Adams’ Thérèse Raquin is very much in the latter category, one of those moments of musical theatre perfection that work as music, as drama, as theatre, as pure art.
Adams and Nona Shepphard’s adaptation of Zola’s novel played at the Finborough in 2014 and then transferred to the larger Park in one of those really sensible moments theatreland sometimes has. Musically complex and dramatically interesting as a radical interpretation of the book, it delved deep into Thérèse’s psychology and aided by a stunning performance from Julie Atherton, worked beautifully.

The score stands up well on disc, its through-sung narrative clear as a bell and really assisted by the introduction of a sonorous Greek chorus of Claire Greenway, Ellie Kirk and Lucy O’Byrne who provide commentary and alternative takes on the tragic events. Atherton connects viscerally with illicit love Laurent, a virile Greg Barnett and contemptuously with husband Jeremy Legat’s Camille to bring real fire to their love triangle and its consequences, the climactic ‘If I Had Known’ is just devastatingly good.
But it’s the combination of them with the complex choral work of the company that really makes this an extraordinary musical, rich and evocative in a way that is all too rarely seen in new musicals, certainly on larger stages, and so it’s a real boon to have this recording to remember the show by and hopefully spearhead a fine set of revivals to come.

CD Review: MS. A Song Cycle

“I wish you didn’t have to be in pain”


Multiple Sclerosis affects over 100,000 people in the UK alone. 


One of the accusations often levelled by detractors of musical theatre is that it is fanciful, frivolous stuff, unable of taking subjects seriously. And whilst the form undoubtedly can have its lighter moments, I’d challenge anyone to listen to this new song cycle inspired by women living with multiple sclerosis and remain unmoved. MS. A Song Cycle is the brainchild of lyricist Rory Sherman, who has worked with SimG Productions, musical supervisor Ellie Verkerk and 14 different teams of composers and performers to create a delicately but undeniably powerful collection of stories, that gain in that power from being sung so beautifully as they are here.
More than two to three times more women are affected than men


Using the song cycle format means that Sherman can shift the perspective around the many ways in which MS can affect women both directly and indirectly, from mothers and daughters to wives, carers and sufferers. So Paul Boyd’s ‘Mummy’s Not Well’ sees a young girl dispatched to live with her aunt after her mother falls ill, Lauren Samuels perfectly cast in this almost John Kander-esque tune; Amy Bowie’s ‘Perhaps I’m Stronger Than I Think’ has Jodie Jacobs’ support group leader giving the benefit of her experience; Verity Quade’s Commute traces the difficulties that can be found in carrying out even the most mundane of daily tasks, as evocatively explained by Anna Francolini.
14 people are diagnosed with the disease everyday.


It is a deeply compelling collection of stories but also a marvellously, and thoughtfully, varied journey of songwriting. Wryly comic numbers rub shoulders with sadder, more reflective songs and throughout the tone is never self-pitying but rather utterly compassionate in its sensitive telling of how awful a condition MS is. The excellent ‘What’s That, Jim?’ sees a rare Drewe-less appearance from George Stiles as Caroline Quentin channels something of Victoria Wood’s beautifully bittersweet domestic observations, and Janie Dee’s ‘Alone In The Dark’, written by Eamonn O’Dwyer, and Laura Pitt-Pulford’s ‘Cerulean Skies’ by Sarah Travis are both soaringly beautiful ballads. 

Most people are diagnosed in their 20s/30s


For me, the highlights of the album come with Josefina Gabrielle’s ‘My Son’s Secret’, Sherman unfurling a rather amusing tale of a mother’s discovery of alternative treatments to Tamar Broadbent’s driving music. And in a most pleasing turn up for the books, Julie Atherton (who might have seemed a natural choice for that song, given her wicked way with a comic song) gets the chance to sing with a pure and devastating simplicity in Erin Murray Quinlan’s heartbreaking ‘How Can I Tell You?’, the cream of a very talented crop, coming together to shine much needed light and hopefully increased awareness about MS>
Available in physical format from www.SimGProductions.com now (and available digitally later in the year). 
Complete song list
‘The Frayed Chords Of My Life’ sung by Lillie Flynn
Music by George Maguire, Lyrics by Rory Sherman

‘Cadenza’ sung by Alexia Khadime
Music by Brian Lowdermilk, Lyrics by Rory Sherman

‘How Can I Tell You?’ sung by Julie Atherton
Music by Erin Murray Quinlan, Lyrics by Rory Sherman & Erin Murray Quinlan

‘Mummy’s Not Well’ sung by Lauren Samuels
Music by Paul Boyd, Lyrics by Rory Sherman

‘Commute’ sung by Anna Francolini
Music by Verity Quade, Lyrics by Rory Sherman & Verity Quade

‘What’s That, Jim?’ sung by Caroline Quentin
Music by George Stiles, Lyrics by Rory Sherman

‘Perhaps I’m Stronger Than I Think’ sung by Jodie Jacobs
Music by Amy Bowie, Lyrics by Rory Sherman

‘Somewhere Hot’ sung by Siubhan Harrison
Music by Luke Di Somma, Lyrics by Rory Sherman

‘My Son’s Secret’ sung by Josefina Gabrielle
Music by Tamar Broadbent, Lyrics by Rory Sherman & Tamar Broadbent

‘A Few Thousand People’ sung by Preeya Kalidas
Music by Robbie White, Lyrics by Rory Sherman

‘Tortoise & Hare’ sung by Caroline Sheen
Music by Gianni Onori, Lyrics by Rory Sherman

‘Cerulean Skies’ sung by Laura Pitt-Pulford
Music by Sarah Travis, Lyrics by Rory Sherman

‘Alone In The Dark’ sung by Janie Dee
Music by Eamonn O’Dwyer, Lyrics by Rory Sherman & Eamonn O’Dwyer

‘Mondays’ sung by Rosemary Ashe
Music & Lyrics by Robert J. Sherman & Rory Sherman