DVD Review: Peter Pan (2003)

“There are many different kinds of bravery”

It is a truth that every generation gets their own cinematic version of JM Barrie’s classic Peter Pan whether they want it or not (and this year’s Pan bombing heavily for Joe Wright shows it’s not always a good idea) and in 2003, it was PJ Hogan who took on the boy who never grows up, actually casting a boy in the lead role for once. And I have to say it is a rather sweet version of the story, a charming adaptation that captures much of the child-like glee associated with the story.

There’s nothing particularly innovative about this interpretation, it just does traditional very well whilst still managing subtle differences. Jeremy Sumpter’s sprightly Peter and Rachel Hurd-Wood ‘s impassioned Wendy are just perfect, both on the cusp of young adulthood and giving a real sense of the confusion of first sexual attractions and the world of possibility it opens. And Jason Isaac, doubling as Mr Darling and the dastardly Hook, is rather unexpectedly excellent, full of real menace for once as the pirate king. Continue reading “DVD Review: Peter Pan (2003)”

DVD Review: 8 Femmes

 

“Un homme? Pourquoi un homme?”
 
Having recently seen Isabelle Huppert on stage and Fanny Ardant at a film festival, I was reminded that I hadn’t watched François Ozon’s 8 Femmes for some time and I took great pleasure in reacquainting myself with a film I love dearly. If I believed in guilty pleasures this would be up there but for me, there’s no guilt at all, purely pleasure. Adapted by Ozon from the play by Robert Thomas, 8 Femmes is a retro delight, a technicolour musical version of an Agatha Christie-esque murder mystery, beautifully spoofing the overblown Hollywood style.
 
It also boasts quite the roll-call of cross-generational French acting talent in the eight women it gathers in a snowbound country mansion to celebrate Christmas with the single man of the piece Marcel. There’s his wife Gaby (Catherine Deneuve), his mother-in-law Mamy (Danielle Darrieux), his sister-in-law Augustine (Isabelle Huppert), his daughters Catherine (Ludivine Sagnier) and Suzon (Virginie Ledoyen), his sister Pierette (Franny Ardant) and his household staff Madame Chanel (Firmine Richard) and Louise (Emmanelle Béart).

Continue reading “DVD Review: 8 Femmes”

DVD Review: Crime d’amour (Love Crime)

“On fait un bon équipe”

Alain Corneau’s Love Crime may be more familiar to English-speaking audiences as the Brian De Palma remake Passion starring Rachel McAdam and Noomi Rapace but given that l’original features Kristin Scott Thomas and Ludivine Sagnier locked in a titanic battle of wills, on a performance level it probably wins out. That’s not to say though that it isn’t a problematic film, it may open as an intriguing psychological drama but it closes as something of a schlocky thriller.

Scott Thomas plays Christine, a ruthless executive in the French branch of a multinational corporation who will do anything to get the New York promotion she craves, including stealing the ideas of her quietly competent junior Isabelle, Sagnier in impressively muted form. Christine revels in the emotional, even sexual manipulation of her colleague but unaware of the depth of Isabelle’s ambition, she unleashes something traumatic.  Continue reading “DVD Review: Crime d’amour (Love Crime)”

DVD Review: The Devil’s Double

“Latif Yahia is dead. He died in Iran. May God have mercy on him. Now I am Uday Saddam Hussein” 

I worry for Dominic Cooper’s movie career – since heading over to Hollywood his film choices don’t seem to reflect the good actor theatre audiences in the UK know him to be, yet he hasn’t been involved in any big enough flops to have given up on his dream so we continue to see him in dreck like Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter and Need for Speed. Things looked a little brighter for The Devil’s Double, in which he actually delivers two strong performances, but with Die Another Day’s Lee Tamahori directing, the film is much less effective than it could have been.

Son of Saddam, Uday Hussein was a genuinely terrible human being, pampered beyond belief, psychotic in his tendencies and paranoid about being assassinated so former schoolmate Latif Yahia who bore a passing resemblance, was forced to become his body double. Cooper discharges both roles well – Uday’s predilection for the depraved is accompanied with a sickening giggle and Latif’s soul-sickness is barely hidden as he is forced onto the fringes of a decadent world of which he can never be a part nor do anything about. Continue reading “DVD Review: The Devil’s Double”