Review: Imogen, Shakespeare’s Globe

“Is there no way for men to be, but women must be half-workers?”

Whichever way you cut it, I still find that Cymbeline is a tough play to love and it’s not for a lack of trying on my part. I struggled with it at the Sam Wanamaker earlier this year and I’ll be trying out the RSC’s version once it hits the Barbican later this month. As for now, it’s Matthew Dunster’s turn to have a go at the play, this time outside at the Globe and in keeping with the new regime, the play has been “renamed and reclaimed” as Imogen, as befits the part of Cymbeline’s daughter who has in fact twice as many lines.

Even with Maddy Hill (an unexpectedly moving Titania, among others, in Go People’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream) in the title role and a wonderfully diverse ensemble incorporating a signing deaf actor among others, Imogen remained difficult. For all the contemporary gangland setting (Jonathan McGuinness’ king is now a drug lord), Imogen’s o’er-hasty marriage to the feckless Posthumus (a good Ira Mandela Siobhan) and subsequent devotion to him even as he proves himself to be a righteous cock doesn’t quite fly. That said, the energy in the show is one that proves largely irresistible as sexy shenanigans, modern sounds, and kick-ass choreo combine to memorable effect. Continue reading “Review: Imogen, Shakespeare’s Globe”

Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Southwark Playhouse

“Is anyone here a purist?”

Have you ever had a recurring dream? Or Dream, as in A Midsummer Night’s? This marks production number 5 that I’ve seen this year, 6 if you’re inclined to include Russell T Davies’ TV adaptation from last week, but it is to this Shakespearean stalwart, albeit in a deconstructed take, that Go People and Glass Half Full have turned for their latest production.

We enter the Southwark Playhouse’s Large space with no set, no costumes and a group of 7 unprepared actors with no obvious plan aside from to somehow perform this play with 17 characters. But we soon come to see that this is the most carefully constructed of omnishambles here, the text co-opts Act I, Scene ii – the Rude Mechanicals’ first – to sort out its roll-call, before doubling back to deliver Act I, Scene i, and then pauses to allow the ‘director’ to run a Q&A session with the session about whether we miss Egeus or not. Continue reading “Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Southwark Playhouse”