Not-a-Review: Madame Rubinstein, Park

“You can screw my husband but nobody screws my business”

Short on time this week and Madame Rubinstein finishes its run this week so I’m cheating with this one and just going to say that it is a shame that John Misto’s starrily-cast three-hander isn’t as much fun as the photo might suggest.

Running time: 2 hours 10 minutes (with interval)
Photo: Simon Annand
Booking until 27th May, returns only

Album Review: Wit and Whimsy – Songs by Alexander S Bermange

“If only I were famous from the telly”

Across its two discs and twenty-three tracks, there’s an awful lot of whimsy to Alexander S Bermange’s latest compilation album Wit and Whimsy and not quite enough wit to sustain it. Bermange is a composer who has had as much success writing comic songs for radio as he has in straight-up musical theatre (the two shows of his that I’ve seen – The Route to Happiness and Thirteen Days were both part of festivals).

That said, he has an impressive contacts list as evidenced by the range of people who have joined in on the action here – Laura Pitt-Pulford, Tracie Bennett, David Bedella, Cassidy Janson, Emma Williams, even Christopher Biggins. And with a guest list of this quality, naturally there are moments that shine here. Continue reading “Album Review: Wit and Whimsy – Songs by Alexander S Bermange”

DVD Review: Romeo + Juliet (1996)

“Now, the two hours’ traffic of our stage”

One of the more famous cinematic adaptations of any of Shakespeare’s plays has to be Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet. Verona becomes Verona Beach, a palm-fringed ocean-front suburb of LA or maybe Miami, where guns rule the roost with an almost-Western-like abandon, newsreaders recite prologues as news broadcasts on the latest violence to shatter the peace, and the world is full of the raucous vividness that is now more common to us given Luhrmann’s subsequent career. 

So Mercutio is a black drag queen, Queen Mab is a tab of Ecstasy, the balcony scene takes place in a swimming pool, Paris (a youthful Paul Rudd) is Time(ly) Magazine’s Bachelor of the Year etc etc It’s brashly, breathlessly modern and consequently quite divisive. Purists will baulk at the dramatic liberties taken – there’s a dizzying rearrangement of Montagues and Capulets which takes a little getting used to – and the verse speaking is certainly rough around the edges for the most part. Continue reading “DVD Review: Romeo + Juliet (1996)”

DVD Review: Ladies in Lavender

“He might like some of my bottled pears”

A world where the purchase of pilchards instead of coley is the height of excitement seems about right for Ladies in Lavender, the 2004 film written and directed by Charles Dance, from a short story by William J Locke. In a sleepy Cornish fishing village, sisters Janet and Ursula Widdington are living out their days in content co-habitation but the discovery of a shipwreck victim on the beach near their house rumples their quiet existence as they nurse the foreigner back to health.

It’s all very genteel and formally unexciting, the writing veers from soapy contrivances to unsatisfying denouements and it’s hard to get too excited about the film. Where Ladies in Lavender delivers in bucketloads is in casting Maggie Smith and Judi Dench as the sisters, allowing them to work wonders with the slightest of material. Smith’s forthright war widow and Dench’s more wistful spinster imbue their scenes with such aching grace, that you almost forgive the plotting.  Continue reading “DVD Review: Ladies in Lavender”

DVD Review: Wallis and Edward

Taking the well known story of the Abdication Crisis, Wallis and Edward – an ITV TV movie from 2005 – professes to be the first to tell it from the point of view of Mrs Simpson. It’s potentially an interesting approach but one which emerges to be riddled with difficulties in the telling here. Picking up the story from the point at which the affair started with Edward as the Prince of Wales and Wallis still married to her second husband, it progresses through the 1930s as their affair became more involved and problematic as he acceded to the throne in the knowledge that royal protocol would never allow the relationship to continue.

The problem is that it never really becomes an involving love story. Not all relationships that start from adulterous beginnings are doomed, but they do need to work rather harder to convince of their legitimacy (for want of a better term) and that doesn’t really happen here. Joely Richardson’s Wallis is extremely brittle and Stephen Campbell Moore’s Edward the epitome of clipped English royalty but in Sarah Williams’ writing, there never really emerged a love story that I could get behind and so it became a rather dull watch. Continue reading “DVD Review: Wallis and Edward”

Review: Me and My Girl, Sheffield Crucible

“We play the Lambeth way, not like you but a bit more gay”

For its festive musical, Sheffield’s Crucible Theatre has taken on the 1937 classic Me and My Girl with music by Noel Gay and book and lyrics by L Arthur Rose and Douglas Furber. Stephen Fry’s revised book from 1985 is used here, with additional contributions to the revisions by Mike Ockrent, these adding a raft of terrible puns and a modern knowingness to what is a brilliant set of songs. The story is pure musical theatre hokum: East End barrow boy Bill Snibson is uncovered as the long-lost heir to an aristocratic fortune but must prove himself to be ‘fit and proper’ before he can inherit as his new-found relatives try to make him behave like a lord and encourage him to ditch his one true love, Sally Smith: will love conquer all? What do you think!

This is director Anna Mackmin’s first musical and her canniest decision has been to employ Stephen Mears as choreographer as he really is one of the best working in the field, as he proves yet again here. Whilst there is nothing quite as delightfully jaw-dropping as the train sequence from Hello, Dolly!, the Act I finale The Lambeth Walk comes preciously close with a brilliantly conceived and superbly executed routine, spilling with energy and invention and whipping up the audience into singing and clapping along with pure joy. The Sun Has Got His Hat On was another stand-out moment but this show is just full of winners and they are matched by a superlative production and some top quality performances. Continue reading “Review: Me and My Girl, Sheffield Crucible”

Winners of the 2010 What’s On Stage Awards

BEST ACTRESS IN A PLAY
Rachel Weisz – A Streetcar Named Desire at the Donmar Warehouse (24.8%)
Alison Steadman – Enjoy at the Gielgud (12.8%)
Fiona Shaw – Mother Courage & Her Children at the NT Olivier (9.4%)
Helen Mirren – Phedre at the NT Lyttelton (21.60%)
Juliet Stevenson – Duet for One at the Almeida & Vaudeville (7.60%)
Lesley Sharp – The Rise & Fall of Little Voice at the Vaudeville (23.80%

THE CAPITAL BREAKS BEST ACTOR IN A PLAY
Jude Law – Hamlet, Donmar West End at Wyndham’s (40.80%)
David Harewood – The Mountaintop at Theatre 503 & Trafalgar Studios 1 (6.00%)
Dominic West – Life Is a Dream at the Donmar Warehouse (13.60%)
Ken Stott – A View from the Bridge at the Duke of York’s (14.90%)
Mark Rylance – Jerusalem at the Royal Court Downstairs (13.90%)
Samuel West – Enron at the Royal Court Downstairs (10.80%)
Continue reading “Winners of the 2010 What’s On Stage Awards”

2010 What’s On Stage Award nominations

BEST ACTRESS IN A PLAY
Rachel Weisz – A Streetcar Named Desire at the Donmar Warehouse 
Alison Steadman – Enjoy at the Gielgud 
Fiona Shaw – Mother Courage & Her Children at the NT Olivier
Helen Mirren – Phedre at the NT Lyttelton 
Juliet Stevenson – Duet for One at the Almeida & Vaudeville
Lesley Sharp – The Rise & Fall of Little Voice at the Vaudeville 

THE CAPITAL BREAKS BEST ACTOR IN A PLAY
Jude Law – Hamlet, Donmar West End at Wyndham’s 
David Harewood – The Mountaintop at Theatre 503 & Trafalgar Studios 1 
Dominic West – Life Is a Dream at the Donmar Warehouse 
Ken Stott – A View from the Bridge at the Duke of York’s 
Mark Rylance – Jerusalem at the Royal Court Downstairs
Samuel West – Enron at the Royal Court Downstairs  Continue reading “2010 What’s On Stage Award nominations”