Review: Notes From The Field / My Name Is Lucy Barton

A pair of stunning monologues don’t get the public acclaim I think they deserve, as Sea Wall steals headlines from Notes From The Field and My Name Is Lucy Barton

“What are your dreams?”

It bugs me a little that Sea Wall is getting so much attention as God’s gift to the monologue, when there’s two exceptional example of the form selling out major theatres in London right now. No disrespect to Simon Stephens or Andrew Scott but you do wonder whether it is the fact that they’re female-led that means Notes From The Field and My Name Is Lucy Barton haven’t quite broken through in the same way.

It is probably just the enduring Sherlock effect, for we’re talking about artists of the stature of Anna Deavere Smith and Laura Linney who can boast a whole host of Tony and Academy Award nominations between them, plus TV credits from such shows as The West Wing, Frasier and The Big C. And it ain’t as if they haven’t been getting rave reviews either.  Continue reading “Review: Notes From The Field / My Name Is Lucy Barton”

TV Review: Doctor Who Series 10

Episodes, in order of preference
World Enough and Time
Extremis
The Doctor Falls
Thin Ice
Knock Knock
Oxygen
The Eaters of Light
Smile
The Pilot
Empress of Mars
The Pyramid at the End of the World
The Lie of the Land

Top 5 guest spots
1 David Suchet’s Landlord was as perfectly written a character as befits one of our more superior actors
2 Regular readers will know I’m a big fan of Kieran Bew and his astronaut in Oxygen was no exception
3 Nicholas Burns‘ malevolent Sutcliffe was a delightfully Dickensian villain 
4 Another theatrical delight of mine is Anthony Calf, impressive as the pseudo-Victorian Godsacre
5 Rebecca Benson’s young Pict impressively led The Eaters of Light from the front, a perfect vessel for Rona Munro’s vision

Saddest death
Michelle Gomez’s Missy has been a brilliant breath of fresh air and whilst her decision to follow Moffat and Capaldi out the door is understandable, it isn’t any less disappointing. And perhaps the timey-wimeyness of the circumstances around her passing mean that maybe this isn’t the last we see of her…

Most wasted guest actor
I don’t what I expected from the reliably excellent Samantha Spiro in Doctor Who but I didn’t get it from her part in The Doctor Falls.

Gay agenda rating
With Bill onboard, A+!

The 2016 Manchester Theatre Awards winners in full

“It’s grim up north”
 
The Manchester Theatre Awards represent the cream of theatre in my native North-West, too much of which I miss due to cheap train fares being like gold dust. I’m hoping to do better this year and in the meantime, here’s the full list of winners for the 2016 Awards.

 

 

Best Actor
Rob Edwards, To Kill A Mockingbird, Octagon Theatre, Bolton
David Neilson, Endgame, HOME, Manchester
Daniel Rigby, Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange, Manchester WINNER
Don Warrington, King Lear, Royal Exchange

Best Actress
Niamh Cusack, Ghosts, HOME
Kaisa Hammarlund, Sweet Charity, Royal Exchange
Julie Hesmondhalgh, Wit, Royal Exchange WINNER
Kathryn Hunter, The Emperor, HOME

Best Production
Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange WINNER
Ghosts, HOME
The Emperor, HOME
Wit, Royal Exchange

Best Supporting Actor
Daniel Crossley, Sweet Charity, Royal Exchange WINNER
Raad Rawi, Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange
Marc Small, To Kill A Mockingbird, Octagon Theatre
Miltos Yerolemou, King Lear, Royal Exchange

Best Supporting Actress
Natalie Dew, Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange WINNER
Sharon Duncan-Brewster, A Streetcar Named Desire, Royal Exchange
Natalie Grady, Martha Josie and the Chinese Elvis, Octagon Theatre
Amy Nuttall, The Winter’s Tale, Octagon Theatre

Best Visiting Production
946 – The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tipps, HOME
A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing, Lowry, Salford
Love’s Labour’s Lost / Much Ado About Nothing, Opera House
The Encounter, HOME
The James Plays, Lowry WINNER

Best Actor in a Visiting Production
Edward Bennett, Love’s Labour’s Lost / Much Ado About Nothing, Opera House
Rufus Hound, The Wind in the Willows, The Lowry WINNER
Simon McBurney, The Encounter, HOME
Michael Pennington, King Lear, Opera House

Best Actress in a Visiting Production
Lisa Dillon, Love’s Labour’s Lost / Much Ado About Nothing, Opera House
Aoife Duffin, A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing, Lowry WINNER
Lisa Maxwell, End Of The Rainbow, Opera House
Zizi Strallen, Mary Poppins, Palace

Best Newcomer
Daisy Badger, Look Back In Anger, Octagon Theatre
Ben Hunter, The Girls, Lowry
Norah Lopez Holden, Ghosts, HOME WINNER
Kirsty Rider, Pride And Prejudice, Lowry
Holly Willock, The Wind In The Willows, Lowry
Young “Michael” cast, Billy Elliot, Palace WINNER
Young “Scout” cast, To Kill A Mockingbird, Octagon Theatre WINNER


Best Opera

Andrea Chénier, Opera North, Lowry WINNER
Billy Budd, Opera North, Lowry
Don Giovanni, ETO, Buxton Opera House
Tamerlano, Buxton Festival, Buxton Opera House

The Robert Robson Award for Best Dance
Akram Khan’s Giselle, Palace WINNER
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Lowry
Nederlands Dans Theater 2, Lowry
The Red Shoes, Lowry

Best Musical
Billy Elliot, Palace
Parade, Hope Mill Theatre
Singin’ in the Rain, Octagon Theatre
Sweet Charity, Royal Exchange WINNER
The Wind in the Willows, Lowry

Best Fringe Production
Boomtown Gals, Various venues
Die Diana, Bandit, Mugger and Thief, Manchester
Multi Story, Monkeywood, Various venues
The Trial, Hope Mill Theatre, Manchester WINNER

Best Fringe Performance
Joyce Branagh, Boomtown Gals, Various venues WINNER
Sam Grogan, Waiting Room, King’s Arms, Salford
William J Holstead, The Trial, Hope Mill Theatre
Leanne Martin, The Brink, King’s Arms

Best Studio Production
Dirty Pakistani Lingerie, Lowry
Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons, HOME
The Solid Life Of Sugar Water, Royal Exchange
Wish List, Royal Exchange WINNER

Best Actor in a Studio Production
Alexander Gatehouse, Ventoux, Lowry
Joseph Quinn, Wish List, Royal Exchange Studio WINNER
Rex Ryan, Pilgrim, Lowry

Best Actress in a Studio Production
Erin Doherty, Wish List, Royal Exchange Studio WINNER
Sarah Emmott, Declaration, Lowry
Georgia Henshaw, Bird, Royal Exchange Studio
Molly Vevers, Ross and Rachel, Lowry

Best New Play
A Pacifist’s Guide to the War on Cancer, HOME
Bird, Royal Exchange Studio
The Emperor, HOME WINNER
Wish List, Royal Exchange Studio

Best Design
Endgame, HOME
La Vie Parisienne, Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester
Singin’ In The Rain, Octagon Theatre WINNER
The Pitmen Painters, Coliseum, Oldham

Best Ensemble
946 – The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tipps, HOME
Singin’ In The Rain, Octagon Theatre WINNER
The Pitmen Painters, Coliseum
The James Plays, Lowry

Best Special Entertainment
An Anatomie In Four Quarters, Lowry
Cirque du Soleil – Amaluna, Trafford Centre
Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring, Old Granada Studios
The Peony Pavillion, Lowry WINNER

Youth Panel Award
NOTHING – The Royal Exchange Theatre Young Company WINNER
The Secret Garden – Octagon Youth Theatre
The Factory – The Royal Exchange Theatre Young Company
The Siege of Christmas – Contact Youth Company with Swung Low

Looking ahead to 2015

I realise I’m just adding (belatedly) to the plethora of 2015 features already published but so many of them trod the boringly familiar ground of forthcoming West End shows (and in the Evening Standard’s case, managed to recommend booking for three shows already sold out from their list of six). So I’ve cast my net a little wider and chosen a few random categories for just some of the shows I’m recommending and looking forward to in 2015.

Continue reading “Looking ahead to 2015”

Winners of the 2014 London Evening Standard Theatre Awards

BEST ACTOR
WINNER Tom Hiddleston, Coriolanus, Donmar Warehouse
Ben Miles, Wolf Hall and Bring Up The Bodies, RSC Swan and Aldwych
Mark Strong, A View From The Bridge, Young Vic

NATASHA RICHARDSON AWARD FOR BEST ACTRESS
WINNER Gillian Anderson, A Streetcar Named Desire, Young Vic
Helen McCrory, Medea, National Theatre’s Olivier
Tanya Moodie, Intimate Apparel, Ustinov Bath and Park Theatre
Billie Piper, Great Britain, National Theatre’s Lyttelton
Kristin Scott Thomas, Electra, Old Vic Continue reading “Winners of the 2014 London Evening Standard Theatre Awards”

The 2014 London Evening Standard Theatre Awards

BEST ACTOR
Tom Hiddleston, Coriolanus, Donmar Warehouse
Ben Miles
Wolf Hall and Bring Up The Bodies, RSC Swan and Aldwych
Mark StrongA View From The Bridge, Young Vic

NATASHA RICHARDSON AWARD FOR BEST ACTRESS
Gillian Anderson, A Streetcar Named Desire, Young Vic
Helen McCrory
Medea, National Theatre’s Olivier
Tanya MoodieIntimate Apparel, Ustinov Bath and Park Theatre
Billie PiperGreat Britain, National Theatre’s Lyttelton
Kristin Scott ThomasElectra, Old Vic Continue reading “The 2014 London Evening Standard Theatre Awards”

Re-review: The James Plays, National Theatre

“The wheel will turn. The wheel always turns. The wheel will turn around again.”

One of the joys of a boxset is that they can be watched over and over again so when I equated the joy of seeing all three of The James Plays on the same day as below 

 I kind of knew in the back of my mind that I would be trying my damnedest to get to the second of the two three-show-days in order to get that experience again whilst the opportunity was there. 

And since I’m clearly in credit with the theatrical karma gods at the moment, a ticket made its way into my grateful hands and I was able to go through the whole 10 and a half hour rollercoaster ride through this vibrantly realised cross-section of under-explored Scottish history. As ever, it was great to be able to revisit such interesting plays – original reviews can be read here James I – The Key Will Keep The LockJames II – Day of The Innocents and James III – The True Mirror – especially now there’s a little more distance from the Scottish referendum which coloured much of the coverage of the plays. There isn’t too much more to say about them aside from I hope they are absorbed into the theatrical culture and emerge again soon somehow, somewhere.

Review: James III – The True Mirror (plus overview of the trilogy), National Theatre

“Scotland herself doesn’t know what kind of nation she is half the time but I’ve learned that there’s no sense being frightened of what you don’t know”

If the world of James III – The True Mirror is what Scottish independence might have actually looked like, then I reckon the Yeses might have had it. Pithy remark aside, the costume work is spectacular here, conjuring up a modern classic look for the Scots that is to die for and which also serves as a visual cue into this production, the final of Rona Munro’s James Plays which abandons its medieval setting for this notional updating. Seeing it as the final part of the marathon trilogy day, it was a brilliant shift in tone and the pre-show entertainment (simply not to be missed) just adds to the sparkling invention as pop songs get the ceilidh treatment from Alasdair MacRae.

Though the play may be entitled James III, the reality is that this slice of the Stewart monarchy was indubitably shared with his wife Margaret of Denmark. The third king of his name was a capricious fellow indeed, the self-confessed “sparkle before the dark”, a rebellious dandy concerned far more with the trappings of monarchy than the minutiae of ruling, most amusingly evidenced by his procurement of a choir to accompany him at all times. By contrast, his pragmatic wife (“from a rational nation with reasonable people” lest you forget!) looks after the treasury, pets the furrowed brow of the privy council and generally rules the roost. Of course she does, she’s Sarah Lund! Continue reading “Review: James III – The True Mirror (plus overview of the trilogy), National Theatre”