TV Review: Bodyguard Series 1

Bodyguard reaches a thrilling climax that is sure to disappoint some but left me on the edge of my seat

“I wanted to know who did it, I don’t know who did it”

Except we do finally know who did it. Jed Mercurio’s Bodyguard – an unexpected massive hit and a reminder that the appointment-to-view model is far from over – reached its climax tonight in typically high-tension style, confounding expectations to the end and dashing the dreams of many a conspiracy theorist to boot. Seriously, so glad that Julia Montague remained dead (at least until a sequel is announced and we have to go through this whole farrago again). 

And though it is bound to have its detractors, I have to say I found it all hugely entertaining. If it just wasn’t realistic enough for you, then WTF are you doing watching dramas? If you’re getting swept up in locations in this fictionalised version of London not being where they are in real life, turn the damn thing off! Its not for everyone, that’s absolutely fine, but you don’t have to drag everyone else down with your misery. Continue reading “TV Review: Bodyguard Series 1”

Review: Hobson’s Choice, Octagon

“Do you call this English?…I thought it weren’t the sort we talk in Lancashire”

Though Wigan is nearer to my childhood home, it is the Octagon in Bolton that looms largest in the memory as the theatre we visited most often, particularly for their Christmas shows, school trips and my first ever Macbeth. Yet since leaving for university and latterly becoming a theatre blogger, I haven’t made a return trip there (possibly in 18 years or so) and so when circumstances prevailed to get me nearby, I decided to make a nostalgic visit.

And given that the play was Harold Brighouse’s Hobson’s Choice, there was something delightfully old-school about the whole thing. David Thacker’s production, co-produced with Newcastle-Under-Lyme’s New Vic and the Oldham Coliseum, beats to a slow and steady rhythm over its three acts and once attuned to its pace, I found it to be a highly enjoyable piece of traditional story-telling. Continue reading “Review: Hobson’s Choice, Octagon”

Review: Bérénice, Donmar Warehouse

“Like sands through the hourglass…”

The quote above is not actually from Alan Hollinghurst’s new version of Racine’s 1670 play Bérénice, but to be honest, no lines from it stuck in my head long enough over a post-show drink for me to record them and thus we have Days of our Lives… The reason that that came into my mind is because the predominant image of Lucy Osborne’s striking design of Josie Rourke’s production is of streams of sand tumbling from the ceiling even as we enter the auditorium, which has been partially reconfigured into the round, with stalls right being shifted 45 degrees to where the stage usually is but the circle seats remaining where they are.

Bérénice has long been in love with Titus, but as she is a Palestinian queen and he is the new Emperor of Rome, theirs is not an easy romance. He decides to finally take her as his wife now that power is his but when he discovers that the Roman public are not that keen on the prospect of a foreign queen, Titus is forced to weigh his personal feelings against his imperial duties. He sends his best friend Antiochus to comfort Bérénice though it soon becomes apparent that he is also in love with her and so a tangle of pained feelings and unfulfilled passion plays out between the trio. Continue reading “Review: Bérénice, Donmar Warehouse”