Review: ManCoin, VAULT Festival

Felix Legge’s ManCoin proves a  chilling reminder of how shallow wokeness can be, playing at the VAULT Festival now

“I’m one of the good guys, remember that”

#notallmen right? Felix Legge’s play ManCoin puts the case that, well, it really could be, it really probably is. Guy White wears his wokeness like a badge, his every statement parsed to align with liberal sensibilities, his new cryptocurrency designed to reward those who carry out good deeds. Right on man!  

But peek beneath the proffered bleeding heart and a shell of fragile masculinity becomes apparent, revealed in all its ugliness when Guy has a fight with his girlfriend Polly and a drunken snafu positions him at the forefront of the men’s rights movement. From there, his persecution complex runs wild, showing just how deep – or otherwise – self-proclaimed wokeness is. Continue reading “Review: ManCoin, VAULT Festival”

Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Southwark Playhouse

“Is anyone here a purist?”

Have you ever had a recurring dream? Or Dream, as in A Midsummer Night’s? This marks production number 5 that I’ve seen this year, 6 if you’re inclined to include Russell T Davies’ TV adaptation from last week, but it is to this Shakespearean stalwart, albeit in a deconstructed take, that Go People and Glass Half Full have turned for their latest production.

We enter the Southwark Playhouse’s Large space with no set, no costumes and a group of 7 unprepared actors with no obvious plan aside from to somehow perform this play with 17 characters. But we soon come to see that this is the most carefully constructed of omnishambles here, the text co-opts Act I, Scene ii – the Rude Mechanicals’ first – to sort out its roll-call, before doubling back to deliver Act I, Scene i, and then pauses to allow the ‘director’ to run a Q&A session with the session about whether we miss Egeus or not. Continue reading “Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Southwark Playhouse”